Invis's Angels give back to less fortunate

Invis's Angels give back to less fortunate

Invis For a 15th year, Invis-Mortgage Intelligence delivered goods to homeless shelters across the country on Tuesday, easing the burden of those less fortunate.

Hundreds of the company’s volunteers delivered over 100,000 items to their respective communities across the nation as part of Angels in the Night, an award-winning community program. The items, comprising pajamas,
blankets, boots, hats, coats, food and much, much more, were purchased through fundraising drives throughout the year.

Mortgage Broker Lori Pollice decided to start an Angels in the Night chapter in Kitchener-Waterloo six years ago, and has noticed a sharp increase in annual participation.

“Our fundraiser has been a pub night for the last six years and we’ve doubled in attendees and money raised in those six years,” she said. “It’s amazing how responsive everybody has been to the need and what we do.”

Given how visible homelessness is in Toronto, Pollice didn’t think much of destitution in Kitchener-Waterloo, but a little research proved eye-opening.

“I was in Toronto and the need there is very visible,” she said. “A lot of people are on the streets sleeping, but here in K-W it’s not as visible, so I researched homeless shelters here and it’s unbelievable how many there are, and we didn’t realize they’re there. So the need in K-W is as great as it is in any other city. I thought it would be worthwhile to start a chapter here.”

In a true community effort, McWilliams Moving & Storage donated the supplies truck and Elliott Coach Lines provided a school bus for volunteers to ride to the shelters.

“I personally feel that everybody deserves a chance and I think by helping out and showing them that they’re supported it can go a long way towards making things look a little brighter for them.”

Michael Celuch, a Mortgage Intelligence broker in Windsor, participated in his first Angels in the Night and said he was gratified to be helping shelters for some of the most vulnerable people on the streets, like teenagers.

“I suppose there’s a bit of peace of mind that you’ve done a little bit to help out,” he said. “At this time of the year, we all have families. You get together with support and give gifts, but there are a lot of people out there who don’t have families. They need some assistance and help sometimes.”

Added Pollice, “With it being so cold in Canada, and K-W, everybody deserves to have some warmth.”


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