Scotia news

  • The 2.99 per cent five-year fixed is back

    The rate that attracted Jim Flaherty’s scorn is back, with at least two mortgage brokers offering a 2.99 per cent five-year fixed rate mortgage.

  • Canada's largest producer leaves bank for brokerage

    Canada’s largest producing team in the banking channel has chosen to switch to the broker side by joining Mortgage Alliance.

  • Infographic: Homebuyer spending and saving habits

    CAAMP’s annual State of the Residential Mortgage Market report: What you need to know.

  • Brokers react to Poloz

    In the wake of Stephen Poloz’s announcement that he believes Canada will avoid a housing bubble, brokers may agree but they are still wary of any future interference by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty.

  • ING announces new name

    The bank who left the broker channel following the buyout by ScotiaBank has recently announced a forthcoming name change.

  • CMHC forecast: Atlantic Canada

    The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) released its fourth quarter housing outlook last week and in part four of our four-part series we take a look at what the organization foresees for Atlantic Canada.

  • Banks agree: Market will slow in 2014

    The big banks have all weighed in on the housing market following CREA’s monthly report and there is a consensus among them: Expect the market to slow down in the coming 12 months.

  • CREA: Market to slow

    The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) released its monthly sales numbers for all of Canada and, although the market has normalized following a sluggish start to the year, the organization foresees a slowed market in the coming months.

  • Scotiabank re-forecasts its outlook on the Bank of Canada once again

    The Bank of Nova Scotia has re-forecast its outlook on the Bank of Canada and now believes the bank will hold off on hiking its overnight rate until 2016.

  • Scotiabank: Market to slow in 2014 but are brokers sold?

    Scotiabank has stared into its crystal ball and seen a slow market in 2014 due to interest rate hikes and stunted job growth, though brokers may not be willing to accept the prophecy as gospel.