CAAMP news

  • The Big Story: Association overhaul

    More and more brokers are asking what their associations are doing to earn their dues. The answer, reports Jemima Codrington, depends on whom you ask.

  • Murphy: Gov't may have jumped the gun

    The one-two punch of this summer's mortgage rule and guideline changes may overwhelm the housing market, the president of CAAMP said during a national TV broadcast this week.

  • Brokers fight bank-controlled complaint system

    Brokers are watching closely whether the government will allow Canadian banks to opt out of a federal arbitration system tracking and investigating systemic consumer problems.

  • Regulator weighs in on ethical online issue

    Even if you are not a CAAMP member, it’s more and more likely that you’ll be subjected to the same rules governing the Internet protocol of its members.

  • Friday’s funniest comments of the week

    Where some of you found the time we can’t say, but you burned up our comment line this week with some of the funniest, driest witticisms in months.

  • CAAMP: Our SEO techniques are clean

    CAAMP is fending off allegations it is has broken its own conduct rules with search engine optimization techniques deemed “unethical.”

  • CAAMP lays out SEO ethical rules

    On the heels of a case first brought to light by MortgageBrokerNews.ca, CAAMP is now reiterating the rules governing how members can use a competitor’s name to drive traffic to their websites.

  • Brokers to Associations: Stop road rep 'broker' use

    Mortgage professionals are putting their associations on notice, insisting they use their clout to stop road reps from calling themselves “brokers.”

  • Part-timer defends the controversial practice

    A seasoned broker – now a part-timer – is defending that choice, challenging mortgage professionals who argue the industry has no place for him and a growing number of others.

  • CAAMP director answers criticism of board makeup

    One of only a handful of active brokers on CAAMP’s board of directors is chalking up the limited representation to name recognition challenges and brokers themselves – often reluctance to take time away from their businesses.