Toronto fairways to be turned into living spaces

Toronto fairways to be turned into living spaces

Toronto fairways to be turned into living spaces The sustained demand for expansion in Toronto is shifting the struggle for living space to the city’s golf courses—a battle that none of the fairways might see to survive.
 
Over the past few years, a steady decline in golf players has made communities and private owners realize that turning these green expanses into subdivisions is a financially sound decision, especially considering the highly valued status of Toronto land in the current economic environment.
 
“If you are owner of a piece of property … it’s just become so valuable that you can make so much money off it by selling it for real estate than you can operating a golf course,” Golf Canada CEO Scott Simmons told the Toronto Star. “And because there are so many courses in the GTA, people will simply find another place to play.”
 
Among these future sites for housing development are Copper Creek in Vaughan and the celebrated Glen Abbey in Oakville (which will play host to 3,000 houses, offices, and retail spaces).
 
This turn of events has complicated matters for residents who have paid generous sums to be situated nearby lush green tracts of land—only to face the prospect of being pressed against a bustling neighbourhood.
 
“We will be looking at a cul-de-sac behind our house now,” according to Katie Trusler, whose home will be right across a 184-house development slated for construction in the very near future.
 
“Nobody is against development, but to squeeze so many homes on such little land is insane,” Trusler said.
 
Oakville mayor Rob Burton agreed with the sentiment, adding that the sudden and drastic change from private greenery to sprawling living spaces will do no favors to the city in the long run.
 
“It totally disrupts orderly development of the GTA and local official plans … by putting masses of people where they aren’t planned for.”

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