Brokers hold breath as monolines follow big banks

Brokers hold breath as monolines follow big banks

Brokers hold breath as monolines follow big banks
As the big banks increase their fixed rates, monolines like MCAP and First National are following suit – eliminating any breathing room for brokers already trimming commissions to accommodate clients.
 
“The first question out of their mouth is always ‘What is your best rate?’” says Shawn Mooney, a broker with Verico Bayfield Mortgage Professionals in Airdrie, Alberta. “It was tough to convince them (clients) that there is more about mortgages than just the rate.”
 
RBC, TD and BMO all raised their fixed rates in response to bond prices falling in value last month. Most banks moved from 2.99 to 3.09 per cent on a five-year fixed mortgage – with RBC applying the biggest increase to their five-year closed mortgage, moving it from 3.09 to 3.29.
 
First National raised their 5-year-fixed rate to 3.09 on Friday, after MCAP increased their rate to 3.09 on the same product (but still offering 2.94 on a quick close mortgage).
 
Still, brokers are hoping other monolines will hold fire, winning them a competitive edge without relying on buydowns.
 
“I do feel that the move by the banks to increase their rates will ultimately help brokers,” Mooney told MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “When the banks rates are similar to ours it is tough sometimes to grab a customer who is loyal to the bank and convince them to use one of our lenders they are unfamiliar with.  It will at least grab their attention and give us a better fighting chance of winning those customers from the bank.”
 
Some of the non-bank lenders are expected to cash in, but the real winners will be clients, says Mooney, who will benefit from the expertise of mortgage brokers.
 
“Bankers don’t really know mortgages,” he says. “Sure, they know a lot about banking, but not as much as a broker does. Their lack of expertise in dealing with mortgages is what’s been driving clients our way for the last few years.”
 
Lawrence Kobescak, a broker with OntarioMortgageSuperstore.com, agrees. At the same time, he comments suggest monolines may need to continue pricing their wares lower than the banks despite the vagaries of the bond markets.
 
“These smaller lenders have no choice but to be aggressive on rate to begin to even attract potential customers,” says Kobescak. “This competition between the monolines needs to attract customers and the banks willingness to match their rates will continue to ensure that Canadians are truly offered a competitive rate from both the monolines and the banks.”
8 Comments
  • Robert Stanfield, INVIS 2013-06-11 9:04:45 AM
    All the articles and comments regarding rate, rate, rate are really starting to give me a headache. I don't know if I am lucking out that I seldom have a client that is "loyal" to their bank, or is rate shopping the internet and every bank, but I do not come across all these issues. I physically meet with my clients discuss their goals, give them solutions and they are very happy that the options provided meet their personal goals. Sometimes my rate is lower, sometimes it is a bit higher. When it is a bit higher, I calculate the difference between my rate and the competitors. As long as the difference is less than a $1,000 over 5 years, I have never loss a client. I think it is the brokers that mainly focus on the online business that are experiencing the issues with strong rate wars and buying down rates. But, this is my opinion and my business model.
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  • Kevin - Ontario 2013-06-11 9:25:20 AM
    “Bankers don’t really know mortgages,” he says. “Sure, they know a lot about banking, but not as much as a broker does. Their lack of expertise in dealing with mortgages is what’s been driving clients our way for the last few years.” – Really? If bankers don’t know mortgages then how is it that they have the lion’s share of the mortgage market in Canada? I read comments on here all the time about how brokers like to say that they know more about mortgages than anyone else in Canada. Time for a reality check for some people. The vast majority of bank employees are university educated. The banks have extensive training and compliance programs that they are required to complete annually, like AML legislative testing, unlike mortgage brokers who consider continuing education going to a conference to hear some people on stage talk. That is if they even show up to the speakers after a night on the town. I worked for a bank for many years at the branch level and in credit adjudication. The vast majority of mortgage brokers I dealt with knew less about the ins and outs of mortgage lending than our branch staff did. It was the right decision when we stopped doing business with brokers. Lower instances of delinquency and fraud. Just because you can brow beat your underwriter into making an exception does not mean you know more about mortgages.
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  • Ron Price DLC 2013-06-11 11:45:40 AM
    As I have said before, no one should be able to comment in this venue without identifying themselves like Kevin - Ontario's comment.
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